Moments of Glory orchestrated tune with no melody.

Part  1

Part 2

Part 3

We will start by showing the notes we will need in the two clefs that music for piano is written. First the G clef for the right hand.
Notice that notes are written on a line or a space of the staff and each note is one tick away from the previous or the next one. Also the g clef begins its line from the G note. So you can have the 2nd line of the staff as the mark for G note. You will need to review the notes in the stafs several times in order to get used with them. Now the F clef for the left hand. We begin with the C3 note that is here
Note Durations
The first tune we'll learn is called Moments of Glory and I composed it especcialy for you... Our first goal is to play the melody with our two hands... But we'll begin with each hand separately. A thing you must have in mind is that this tune has only five notes for melody. C,D,E,F,G , we'll place our fingers that way so each finger has one of the notes.
Playing music is not the easiest task, but when you achieve a goal there is always much satisfaction. I encourage you to try it and see each lesson like a level in a video game. You must finish each level to go to the next..
Hi guys, in the 1st lesson we had a goal to play the tune "Moments of Glory" with our two hands. You managed I hope to play the exact same melody with your two hands. Our next step is to learn what accompaniment is. To give you a picture to understand the importance of accompaniment, imagine a big orchestra and a singer. the singer sings the melody and this is what our right hand does. All the instruments that compose this orchestra play the accompaniment for the singer... Usually left hand plays the accompaniment of every tune. Accompaniment consists of chords, and a chord consists from three or more notes played together, or with various other ways. The sequence of chords that is composed in a tune is its Harmony. So, accompaniment is the performance of the harmony of a tune and harmony is the chord sequence, and a chord is composed of three notes... The two common types of chords is the Major and the Minor chords, and they are constructed in a really simple way... let's see the C major chord. It consists of three notes.. The Base or chord name that is C note, pass one note, the third that is E note, pass one note and finally the fifth, G note. Here we need to make a small parenthesis and speak about the distance between the notes. The smallest distance between two keys is called a semitone. And two semitones in a row is called a tone... That's it, so this distance is a semi tone also this one is a semitone, and this is a tone. Ok? Let's go back to C major chord. If you count the distance between the Base and the third you;ll see its 4 semitones, and the distance between the third and fifth is 3 semitones. All major chords are made the same way--- Base plus 4 semitones (to the third of the chord) - plus 3 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) Let's see now the A minor chord. Base is A, we pass one note and find the third that is C, we pass one note and find the fifth that is E note. If we count the distances now we'll see that the third is 3 semitones from the base, and the fifth is 4 semitones from the third. All minor chords are made this way. Base plus 3 semitones (to the third of the chord) plus 4 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) This was a really enormous chapter in music theory. We'll come back to this chapter many times in the next tutorials. As I told you to the first part of the tutorial, you may need to come back and watch again the video to get the meaning well. I know it's a lot of information, but if you you get it you;ll see that basically understanding the music language is pretty simple. Ok. theory ends here. Let's go to our todays target. Playing the accompaniment for Moments of Glory. We'll try two ways of accompaniment. The first way is the following. Let's hear it.
You noticed that there are chord symbols above the notes. This piece consists of six chords Am minor, Dm minor, Em minor C major F major and g major. if you play these triads following the chord sequence by simply moving your left hand over the keys you will clearly hear the song's harmony. This first accompaniment consists of eights notes, and our left hand moves over the notes that construct the chords of the tune. You can see that my hand moves smoothly over the keys, in such way that if you do it some times you can play this without seeing your hands. We have the four beats in our mind and we add the word "and" after each number. The result is eighth notes... Now. The second accompaniment. Lets hear it.
You see we play again eighth notes but we play always two notes together. Let's combine the two hands and play the melody with our right hand and first accompaniment 1.....
Two hands together with accompaniment 2
Let's make a different start of our lesson this time. I want you to make the following experiment. Let's try to perform the tune by exchanging the roles of our two hands. Our left hand now will play the melody, and our right hand will play the accompaniment. By doing this opposite performance we'll give this tune a different feel. Let's try first accompaniment No1.
Now we'll play the melody with our left hand and accompaniment No2 with our right hand...
We'll close the third part and final part of the lesson, by explaining the way that a melody works... Let's see the melody of Moments of glory... Below the melody you will see the harmony of the song. The foundation of every melody is Harmony... So, all the notes that compose the tune's melody are also, notes of the chord that is played at that point. The only exception is these notes, and these notes, that is a melodic movement towards a note of the next chord. As a conclusion I could say that a nice melody first of all needs a nice chord progression or a nice Harmony (same thing). The first step is to use the notes of the chords that we play in order to make a melody... The second step is to make melodic moves with passing notes to go to a note of the next chord...
To go a step further, I'll show you a variation of our Theme, that is made using these two rules... Chord notes and, passing notes, or transitive notes... Now the melody is a bit more dense and interesting... Give a closer look on how the variation is constructed . Let's play the variation... It also uses five notes so your right hands' fingers will play in one position...
And now here is the big goal of the first lesson. We'll combine everything we've learnt in one performance. As you already know we play the theme 4 times in the orchestrated tune. So we will play as follows... 1. Left hand plays melody, Right hand accompaniment 1 2. Left Hand Plays melody, right hand accompaniment 2 3. Right hand plays variation, left hand accompaniment 1 and, 4. Right hand plays variation, and left hand accompaniment 2. In order to achieve the performance of the hole composition you must be able to perform each part individually. So, maybe you need to go back and do some practice and make your two hands collaborate in the tune..
LESSON 1
Moments of Glory orchestrated tune with no melody.

We will start by showing the notes we will need in the two clefs that music for piano is written. First the G clef for the right hand.
Notice that notes are written on a line or a space of the staff and each note is one tick away from the previous or the next one. Also the g clef begins its line from the G note. So you can have the 2nd line of the staff as the mark for G note. You will need to review the notes in the stafs several times in order to get used with them. Now the F clef for the left hand. We begin with the C3 note that is here
Note Durations
The first tune we'll learn is called Moments of Glory and I composed it especcialy for you... Our first goal is to play the melody with our two hands... But we'll begin with each hand separately. A thing you must have in mind is that this tune has only five notes for melody. C,D,E,F,G , we'll place our fingers that way so each finger has one of the notes.
Playing music is not the easiest task, but when you achieve a goal there is always much satisfaction. I encourage you to try it and see each lesson like a level in a video game. You must finish each level to go to the next..
Hi guys, in the 1st lesson we had a goal to play the tune "Moments of Glory" with our two hands. You managed I hope to play the exact same melody with your two hands. Our next step is to learn what accompaniment is. To give you a picture to understand the importance of accompaniment, imagine a big orchestra and a singer. the singer sings the melody and this is what our right hand does. All the instruments that compose this orchestra play the accompaniment for the singer... Usually left hand plays the accompaniment of every tune. Accompaniment consists of chords, and a chord consists from three or more notes played together, or with various other ways. The sequence of chords that is composed in a tune is its Harmony. So, accompaniment is the performance of the harmony of a tune and harmony is the chord sequence, and a chord is composed of three notes... The two common types of chords is the Major and the Minor chords, and they are constructed in a really simple way... let's see the C major chord. It consists of three notes.. The Base or chord name that is C note, pass one note, the third that is E note, pass one note and finally the fifth, G note. Here we need to make a small parenthesis and speak about the distance between the notes. The smallest distance between two keys is called a semitone. And two semitones in a row is called a tone... That's it, so this distance is a semi tone also this one is a semitone, and this is a tone. Ok? Let's go back to C major chord. If you count the distance between the Base and the third you;ll see its 4 semitones, and the distance between the third and fifth is 3 semitones. All major chords are made the same way--- Base plus 4 semitones (to the third of the chord) - plus 3 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) Let's see now the A minor chord. Base is A, we pass one note and find the third that is C, we pass one note and find the fifth that is E note. If we count the distances now we'll see that the third is 3 semitones from the base, and the fifth is 4 semitones from the third. All minor chords are made this way. Base plus 3 semitones (to the third of the chord) plus 4 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) This was a really enormous chapter in music theory. We'll come back to this chapter many times in the next tutorials. As I told you to the first part of the tutorial, you may need to come back and watch again the video to get the meaning well. I know it's a lot of information, but if you you get it you;ll see that basically understanding the music language is pretty simple. Ok. theory ends here. Let's go to our todays target. Playing the accompaniment for Moments of Glory. We'll try two ways of accompaniment. The first way is the following. Let's hear it.
You noticed that there are chord symbols above the notes. This piece consists of six chords Am minor, Dm minor, Em minor C major F major and g major. if you play these triads following the chord sequence by simply moving your left hand over the keys you will clearly hear the song's harmony. This first accompaniment consists of eights notes, and our left hand moves over the notes that construct the chords of the tune. You can see that my hand moves smoothly over the keys, in such way that if you do it some times you can play this without seeing your hands. We have the four beats in our mind and we add the word "and" after each number. The result is eighth notes... Now. The second accompaniment. Lets hear it.
You see we play again eighth notes but we play always two notes together. Let's combine the two hands and play the melody with our right hand and first accompaniment 1.....
Two hands together with accompaniment 2
Let's make a different start of our lesson this time. I want you to make the following experiment. Let's try to perform the tune by exchanging the roles of our two hands. Our left hand now will play the melody, and our right hand will play the accompaniment. By doing this opposite performance we'll give this tune a different feel. Let's try first accompaniment No1.
Now we'll play the melody with our left hand and accompaniment No2 with our right hand...
We'll close the third part and final part of the lesson, by explaining the way that a melody works... Let's see the melody of Moments of glory... Below the melody you will see the harmony of the song. The foundation of every melody is Harmony... So, all the notes that compose the tune's melody are also, notes of the chord that is played at that point. The only exception is these notes, and these notes, that is a melodic movement towards a note of the next chord. As a conclusion I could say that a nice melody first of all needs a nice chord progression or a nice Harmony (same thing). The first step is to use the notes of the chords that we play in order to make a melody... The second step is to make melodic moves with passing notes to go to a note of the next chord...
To go a step further, I'll show you a variation of our Theme, that is made using these two rules... Chord notes and, passing notes, or transitive notes... Now the melody is a bit more dense and interesting... Give a closer look on how the variation is constructed . Let's play the variation... It also uses five notes so your right hands' fingers will play in one position...
And now here is the big goal of the first lesson. We'll combine everything we've learnt in one performance. As you already know we play the theme 4 times in the orchestrated tune. So we will play as follows... 1. Left hand plays melody, Right hand accompaniment 1 2. Left Hand Plays melody, right hand accompaniment 2 3. Right hand plays variation, left hand accompaniment 1 and, 4. Right hand plays variation, and left hand accompaniment 2. In order to achieve the performance of the hole composition you must be able to perform each part individually. So, maybe you need to go back and do some practice and make your two hands collaborate in the tune..
LESSON 1
Moments of Glory orchestrated tune with no melody.

We will start by showing the notes we will need in the two clefs that music for piano is written. First the G clef for the right hand.
Notice that notes are written on a line or a space of the staff and each note is one tick away from the previous or the next one. Also the g clef begins its line from the G note. So you can have the 2nd line of the staff as the mark for G note. You will need to review the notes in the stafs several times in order to get used with them. Now the F clef for the left hand. We begin with the C3 note that is here
Note Durations
The first tune we'll learn is called Moments of Glory and I composed it especcialy for you... Our first goal is to play the melody with our two hands... But we'll begin with each hand separately. A thing you must have in mind is that this tune has only five notes for melody. C,D,E,F,G , we'll place our fingers that way so each finger has one of the notes.
Playing music is not the easiest task, but when you achieve a goal there is always much satisfaction. I encourage you to try it and see each lesson like a level in a video game. You must finish each level to go to the next..
Hi guys, in the 1st lesson we had a goal to play the tune "Moments of Glory" with our two hands. You managed I hope to play the exact same melody with your two hands. Our next step is to learn what accompaniment is. To give you a picture to understand the importance of accompaniment, imagine a big orchestra and a singer. the singer sings the melody and this is what our right hand does. All the instruments that compose this orchestra play the accompaniment for the singer... Usually left hand plays the accompaniment of every tune. Accompaniment consists of chords, and a chord consists from three or more notes played together, or with various other ways. The sequence of chords that is composed in a tune is its Harmony. So, accompaniment is the performance of the harmony of a tune and harmony is the chord sequence, and a chord is composed of three notes... The two common types of chords is the Major and the Minor chords, and they are constructed in a really simple way... let's see the C major chord. It consists of three notes.. The Base or chord name that is C note, pass one note, the third that is E note, pass one note and finally the fifth, G note. Here we need to make a small parenthesis and speak about the distance between the notes. The smallest distance between two keys is called a semitone. And two semitones in a row is called a tone... That's it, so this distance is a semi tone also this one is a semitone, and this is a tone. Ok? Let's go back to C major chord. If you count the distance between the Base and the third you;ll see its 4 semitones, and the distance between the third and fifth is 3 semitones. All major chords are made the same way--- Base plus 4 semitones (to the third of the chord) - plus 3 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) Let's see now the A minor chord. Base is A, we pass one note and find the third that is C, we pass one note and find the fifth that is E note. If we count the distances now we'll see that the third is 3 semitones from the base, and the fifth is 4 semitones from the third. All minor chords are made this way. Base plus 3 semitones (to the third of the chord) plus 4 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) This was a really enormous chapter in music theory. We'll come back to this chapter many times in the next tutorials. As I told you to the first part of the tutorial, you may need to come back and watch again the video to get the meaning well. I know it's a lot of information, but if you you get it you;ll see that basically understanding the music language is pretty simple. Ok. theory ends here. Let's go to our todays target. Playing the accompaniment for Moments of Glory. We'll try two ways of accompaniment. The first way is the following. Let's hear it.
You noticed that there are chord symbols above the notes. This piece consists of six chords Am minor, Dm minor, Em minor C major F major and g major. if you play these triads following the chord sequence by simply moving your left hand over the keys you will clearly hear the song's harmony. This first accompaniment consists of eights notes, and our left hand moves over the notes that construct the chords of the tune. You can see that my hand moves smoothly over the keys, in such way that if you do it some times you can play this without seeing your hands. We have the four beats in our mind and we add the word "and" after each number. The result is eighth notes... Now. The second accompaniment. Lets hear it.
You see we play again eighth notes but we play always two notes together. Let's combine the two hands and play the melody with our right hand and first accompaniment 1.....
Two hands together with accompaniment 2
Let's make a different start of our lesson this time. I want you to make the following experiment. Let's try to perform the tune by exchanging the roles of our two hands. Our left hand now will play the melody, and our right hand will play the accompaniment. By doing this opposite performance we'll give this tune a different feel. Let's try first accompaniment No1.
Now we'll play the melody with our left hand and accompaniment No2 with our right hand...
We'll close the third part and final part of the lesson, by explaining the way that a melody works... Let's see the melody of Moments of glory... Below the melody you will see the harmony of the song. The foundation of every melody is Harmony... So, all the notes that compose the tune's melody are also, notes of the chord that is played at that point. The only exception is these notes, and these notes, that is a melodic movement towards a note of the next chord. As a conclusion I could say that a nice melody first of all needs a nice chord progression or a nice Harmony (same thing). The first step is to use the notes of the chords that we play in order to make a melody... The second step is to make melodic moves with passing notes to go to a note of the next chord...
To go a step further, I'll show you a variation of our Theme, that is made using these two rules... Chord notes and, passing notes, or transitive notes... Now the melody is a bit more dense and interesting... Give a closer look on how the variation is constructed . Let's play the variation... It also uses five notes so your right hands' fingers will play in one position...
And now here is the big goal of the first lesson. We'll combine everything we've learnt in one performance. As you already know we play the theme 4 times in the orchestrated tune. So we will play as follows... 1. Left hand plays melody, Right hand accompaniment 1 2. Left Hand Plays melody, right hand accompaniment 2 3. Right hand plays variation, left hand accompaniment 1 and, 4. Right hand plays variation, and left hand accompaniment 2. In order to achieve the performance of the hole composition you must be able to perform each part individually. So, maybe you need to go back and do some practice and make your two hands collaborate in the tune..
LESSON 1
Moments of Glory orchestrated tune with no melody.

We will start by showing the notes we will need in the two clefs that music for piano is written. First the G clef for the right hand.
Notice that notes are written on a line or a space of the staff and each note is one tick away from the previous or the next one. Also the g clef begins its line from the G note. So you can have the 2nd line of the staff as the mark for G note. You will need to review the notes in the stafs several times in order to get used with them. Now the F clef for the left hand. We begin with the C3 note that is here
Note Durations
The first tune we'll learn is called Moments of Glory and I composed it especcialy for you... Our first goal is to play the melody with our two hands... But we'll begin with each hand separately. A thing you must have in mind is that this tune has only five notes for melody. C,D,E,F,G , we'll place our fingers that way so each finger has one of the notes.
Playing music is not the easiest task, but when you achieve a goal there is always much satisfaction. I encourage you to try it and see each lesson like a level in a video game. You must finish each level to go to the next..
Hi guys, in the 1st lesson we had a goal to play the tune "Moments of Glory" with our two hands. You managed I hope to play the exact same melody with your two hands. Our next step is to learn what accompaniment is. To give you a picture to understand the importance of accompaniment, imagine a big orchestra and a singer. the singer sings the melody and this is what our right hand does. All the instruments that compose this orchestra play the accompaniment for the singer... Usually left hand plays the accompaniment of every tune. Accompaniment consists of chords, and a chord consists from three or more notes played together, or with various other ways. The sequence of chords that is composed in a tune is its Harmony. So, accompaniment is the performance of the harmony of a tune and harmony is the chord sequence, and a chord is composed of three notes... The two common types of chords is the Major and the Minor chords, and they are constructed in a really simple way... let's see the C major chord. It consists of three notes.. The Base or chord name that is C note, pass one note, the third that is E note, pass one note and finally the fifth, G note. Here we need to make a small parenthesis and speak about the distance between the notes. The smallest distance between two keys is called a semitone. And two semitones in a row is called a tone... That's it, so this distance is a semi tone also this one is a semitone, and this is a tone. Ok? Let's go back to C major chord. If you count the distance between the Base and the third you;ll see its 4 semitones, and the distance between the third and fifth is 3 semitones. All major chords are made the same way--- Base plus 4 semitones (to the third of the chord) - plus 3 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) Let's see now the A minor chord. Base is A, we pass one note and find the third that is C, we pass one note and find the fifth that is E note. If we count the distances now we'll see that the third is 3 semitones from the base, and the fifth is 4 semitones from the third. All minor chords are made this way. Base plus 3 semitones (to the third of the chord) plus 4 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) This was a really enormous chapter in music theory. We'll come back to this chapter many times in the next tutorials. As I told you to the first part of the tutorial, you may need to come back and watch again the video to get the meaning well. I know it's a lot of information, but if you you get it you;ll see that basically understanding the music language is pretty simple. Ok. theory ends here. Let's go to our todays target. Playing the accompaniment for Moments of Glory. We'll try two ways of accompaniment. The first way is the following. Let's hear it.
You noticed that there are chord symbols above the notes. This piece consists of six chords Am minor, Dm minor, Em minor C major F major and g major. if you play these triads following the chord sequence by simply moving your left hand over the keys you will clearly hear the song's harmony. This first accompaniment consists of eights notes, and our left hand moves over the notes that construct the chords of the tune. You can see that my hand moves smoothly over the keys, in such way that if you do it some times you can play this without seeing your hands. We have the four beats in our mind and we add the word "and" after each number. The result is eighth notes... Now. The second accompaniment. Lets hear it.
You see we play again eighth notes but we play always two notes together. Let's combine the two hands and play the melody with our right hand and first accompaniment 1.....
Two hands together with accompaniment 2
Let's make a different start of our lesson this time. I want you to make the following experiment. Let's try to perform the tune by exchanging the roles of our two hands. Our left hand now will play the melody, and our right hand will play the accompaniment. By doing this opposite performance we'll give this tune a different feel. Let's try first accompaniment No1.
Now we'll play the melody with our left hand and accompaniment No2 with our right hand...
We'll close the third part and final part of the lesson, by explaining the way that a melody works... Let's see the melody of Moments of glory... Below the melody you will see the harmony of the song. The foundation of every melody is Harmony... So, all the notes that compose the tune's melody are also, notes of the chord that is played at that point. The only exception is these notes, and these notes, that is a melodic movement towards a note of the next chord. As a conclusion I could say that a nice melody first of all needs a nice chord progression or a nice Harmony (same thing). The first step is to use the notes of the chords that we play in order to make a melody... The second step is to make melodic moves with passing notes to go to a note of the next chord...
To go a step further, I'll show you a variation of our Theme, that is made using these two rules... Chord notes and, passing notes, or transitive notes... Now the melody is a bit more dense and interesting... Give a closer look on how the variation is constructed . Let's play the variation... It also uses five notes so your right hands' fingers will play in one position...
And now here is the big goal of the first lesson. We'll combine everything we've learnt in one performance. As you already know we play the theme 4 times in the orchestrated tune. So we will play as follows... 1. Left hand plays melody, Right hand accompaniment 1 2. Left Hand Plays melody, right hand accompaniment 2 3. Right hand plays variation, left hand accompaniment 1 and, 4. Right hand plays variation, and left hand accompaniment 2. In order to achieve the performance of the hole composition you must be able to perform each part individually. So, maybe you need to go back and do some practice and make your two hands collaborate in the tune..
LESSON 1
Moments of Glory orchestrated tune with no melody.

We will start by showing the notes we will need in the two clefs that music for piano is written. First the G clef for the right hand.
Notice that notes are written on a line or a space of the staff and each note is one tick away from the previous or the next one. Also the g clef begins its line from the G note. So you can have the 2nd line of the staff as the mark for G note. You will need to review the notes in the stafs several times in order to get used with them. Now the F clef for the left hand. We begin with the C3 note that is here
Note Durations
The first tune we'll learn is called Moments of Glory and I composed it especcialy for you... Our first goal is to play the melody with our two hands... But we'll begin with each hand separately. A thing you must have in mind is that this tune has only five notes for melody. C,D,E,F,G , we'll place our fingers that way so each finger has one of the notes.
Playing music is not the easiest task, but when you achieve a goal there is always much satisfaction. I encourage you to try it and see each lesson like a level in a video game. You must finish each level to go to the next..
Hi guys, in the 1st lesson we had a goal to play the tune "Moments of Glory" with our two hands. You managed I hope to play the exact same melody with your two hands. Our next step is to learn what accompaniment is. To give you a picture to understand the importance of accompaniment, imagine a big orchestra and a singer. the singer sings the melody and this is what our right hand does. All the instruments that compose this orchestra play the accompaniment for the singer... Usually left hand plays the accompaniment of every tune. Accompaniment consists of chords, and a chord consists from three or more notes played together, or with various other ways. The sequence of chords that is composed in a tune is its Harmony. So, accompaniment is the performance of the harmony of a tune and harmony is the chord sequence, and a chord is composed of three notes... The two common types of chords is the Major and the Minor chords, and they are constructed in a really simple way... let's see the C major chord. It consists of three notes.. The Base or chord name that is C note, pass one note, the third that is E note, pass one note and finally the fifth, G note. Here we need to make a small parenthesis and speak about the distance between the notes. The smallest distance between two keys is called a semitone. And two semitones in a row is called a tone... That's it, so this distance is a semi tone also this one is a semitone, and this is a tone. Ok? Let's go back to C major chord. If you count the distance between the Base and the third you;ll see its 4 semitones, and the distance between the third and fifth is 3 semitones. All major chords are made the same way--- Base plus 4 semitones (to the third of the chord) - plus 3 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) Let's see now the A minor chord. Base is A, we pass one note and find the third that is C, we pass one note and find the fifth that is E note. If we count the distances now we'll see that the third is 3 semitones from the base, and the fifth is 4 semitones from the third. All minor chords are made this way. Base plus 3 semitones (to the third of the chord) plus 4 semitones (to the fifth of the chord) This was a really enormous chapter in music theory. We'll come back to this chapter many times in the next tutorials. As I told you to the first part of the tutorial, you may need to come back and watch again the video to get the meaning well. I know it's a lot of information, but if you you get it you;ll see that basically understanding the music language is pretty simple. Ok. theory ends here. Let's go to our todays target. Playing the accompaniment for Moments of Glory. We'll try two ways of accompaniment. The first way is the following. Let's hear it.
You noticed that there are chord symbols above the notes. This piece consists of six chords Am minor, Dm minor, Em minor C major F major and g major. if you play these triads following the chord sequence by simply moving your left hand over the keys you will clearly hear the song's harmony. This first accompaniment consists of eights notes, and our left hand moves over the notes that construct the chords of the tune. You can see that my hand moves smoothly over the keys, in such way that if you do it some times you can play this without seeing your hands. We have the four beats in our mind and we add the word "and" after each number. The result is eighth notes... Now. The second accompaniment. Lets hear it.
You see we play again eighth notes but we play always two notes together. Let's combine the two hands and play the melody with our right hand and first accompaniment 1.....
Two hands together with accompaniment 2
Let's make a different start of our lesson this time. I want you to make the following experiment. Let's try to perform the tune by exchanging the roles of our two hands. Our left hand now will play the melody, and our right hand will play the accompaniment. By doing this opposite performance we'll give this tune a different feel. Let's try first accompaniment No1.
Now we'll play the melody with our left hand and accompaniment No2 with our right hand...
We'll close the third part and final part of the lesson, by explaining the way that a melody works... Let's see the melody of Moments of glory... Below the melody you will see the harmony of the song. The foundation of every melody is Harmony... So, all the notes that compose the tune's melody are also, notes of the chord that is played at that point. The only exception is these notes, and these notes, that is a melodic movement towards a note of the next chord. As a conclusion I could say that a nice melody first of all needs a nice chord progression or a nice Harmony (same thing). The first step is to use the notes of the chords that we play in order to make a melody... The second step is to make melodic moves with passing notes to go to a note of the next chord...
To go a step further, I'll show you a variation of our Theme, that is made using these two rules... Chord notes and, passing notes, or transitive notes... Now the melody is a bit more dense and interesting... Give a closer look on how the variation is constructed . Let's play the variation... It also uses five notes so your right hands' fingers will play in one position...
And now here is the big goal of the first lesson. We'll combine everything we've learnt in one performance. As you already know we play the theme 4 times in the orchestrated tune. So we will play as follows... 1. Left hand plays melody, Right hand accompaniment 1 2. Left Hand Plays melody, right hand accompaniment 2 3. Right hand plays variation, left hand accompaniment 1 and, 4. Right hand plays variation, and left hand accompaniment 2. In order to achieve the performance of the hole composition you must be able to perform each part individually. So, maybe you need to go back and do some practice and make your two hands collaborate in the tune..